The University of North Carolina Scholarly Communications Working Group

April 2014 Topic

April 4th, 2014 by Megan Kilb in Uncategorized · No Comments

Topic: Digital Humanities at UNC: An Update on the Digital Innovation Lab and Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative
Speakers: Pam Lach, Digital Innovation Lab (DIL) Manager and Stephanie Barnwell, Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative (CDHI) Programs Coordinator
Where: Davis Library 214 A/B
When: Wednesday, April 9, 2014 at noon

DIL Manager, Pam Lach, and CDHI Programs Coordinator, Stephanie Barnwell, will talk about the activities of the CDHI and DIL over the past year, including the establishment and implementation of several DH-related programs, from faculty hires to graduate fellowships. They will also share some newly-launched projects.

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March 2014 Topic

March 11th, 2014 by Anne Gilliland in Uncategorized · No Comments

Topic: Privacy Issues in Digitization: Law, Privacy and Practicalities
Speaker: Anne Klinefelter, UNC Law Library Director
Where: Davis Library 214 A/B
When: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 at noon

Anne Klinefelter will speak on Privacy Issues in Digitization: Law, Privacy and Practicalities, with a special emphasis on privacy issues encountered during the UNC Law Library’s project to digitize North Carolina Supreme Court documents.

Ms. Klinefelter is Director of the UNC Law Library and Associate Professor of Law.  She serves on the advisory board of the UNC Center for Media Law and Policy and of the Future of Privacy Forum.

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January 2014 Topic

December 20th, 2013 by Tom Elrod in Uncategorized · No Comments

Title: Reinventing the University Press
Speakers: John Sherer, Director of the University of North Carolina Press
Where: Davis Library 214 A/B
When: Tuesday, January 7th, 2014

University presses thrived for much of the 20th century by embracing information scarcity models and creating a cost recovery economic system. But as we move from information scarcity to information abundance, and as the cost-recovery model has withered under fiscal and economic pressure, how does a press adapt? And is there an opportunity amidst the disruption to build a more efficient, more accessible, and more sustainable scholarly publishing program? The new director at UNC Press will discuss how they are facing these challenges, and how through the use of digital workflows and products, they are expanding their publishing program, disseminating scholarship more broadly and with more discoverability than ever before, while simultaneously reducing its prices.

John Sherer was named the seventh director of the University of North Carolina Press in June of 2012. Prior to that, he was the publisher of Basic Books in New York and also held the positions of Publisher of Nation Books, member of the AAP Trade Executive Committee, and adjunct professor at New York University’s School for Continuing and Professional Studies. He has held marketing positions at Henry Holt, the Brookings Institution and was a manager and buyer at Olsson’s Books and Records in Washington, DC. He is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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November 2013 Topic

October 15th, 2013 by Tom Elrod in Uncategorized · No Comments

Title: The Religion in North Carolina Digital Collection: A Multi-Year, Multi-Partner Project
Speakers: Elizabeth DeBold, Project Coordinator, Religion in North Carolina Digital Collection, Duke University, Divinity School Library & Eileen McGrath, Associate Curator, North Carolina Collection, UNC-Chapel Hill
Where: Davis Library 214 A/B
When: Wednesday, November 13

The Religion in North Carolina Digital Collection seeks to bring together, preserve, and provide access to primary materials of religious bodies in North Carolina. Materials include the histories of local religious bodies (individual churches, synagogues, etc.) as well as publications of larger North Carolina denominations or cooperative networks. Type of materials may include books, pamphlets, reports, minutes, and magazines that describe the history of local religious bodies and their leaders.

Elizabeth DeBold is the Project Coordinator for the Religion in North Carolina Digital Collection at the Duke University Divinity School Library. She graduated this past May from the UNC School of Information and Library Science with her MSLS and a concentration in Archives and Records Management. While a student at SILS, she spent two years working as a Graduate Assistant in the North Carolina Collection at Wilson Library, where she assisted with UNC’s first year of contributions to this project.

Eileen McGrath is the Associate Curator of the North Carolina Collection at UNC-Chapel Hill and has been responsible for the development of its print collection since 1994. She is also the owner and contributor to Read North Carolina Novels (http://blogs.lib.unc.edu/ncnovels/), a blog that features novels, old and new, set in North Carolina. She holds a master’s degree in library science from George Peabody College for Teachers and a master’s degree in religion from Vanderbilt University.

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Open Access: Getting More Reach for Your Research: Program with Heather Joseph

October 9th, 2013 by Tom Elrod in Uncategorized · No Comments

As part of Open Access week, Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC, will be speaking about maximizing the reach of faculty research on October 22 from 2-4 PM in the Pleasants Family Assembly Room in Wilson Library. More information can be found here.

openaccess2013

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October 2013 Topic

October 9th, 2013 by Tom Elrod in Uncategorized · No Comments

Rescheduled from September

Title: Serving the Information Poor: eGranary digital libraries in developing countries and incarcerated populations
Speaker: Cliff Missen, Clinical Associate Professor, UNC-SILS, and Director of the WiderNet Project
Where: Davis Library 214 A/B
When: Wednesday, October 9

Cliff Missen will provide an overview of the off-line eGranary Digital Library and the challenges that WiderNet faces when introducing new information technologies to people with little or no Internet experience.

Bio: Cliff Missen is Director of the nonprofit WiderNet Project and WiderNet@UNC, a service initiative of the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Launched in 2000, this project aims to improve digital communication in developing countries by identifying and promoting affordable technology. WiderNet trains computer technicians and coaches decision-makers across the developing world. It provides on-site hands-on training and conducts research on low cost information technology. Over 6,000 technicians, decision makers, and librarians have been through WiderNet training programs. WiderNet also produces the eGranary Digital Library, an innovative way to deliver the world’s knowledge to people and institutions with inadequate Internet access. Containing over 30 million Web resources, it is installed in more than 600 schools, hospitals, libraries, and universities in Africa, India, Bangladesh, and Haiti. Missen was a Senior Fulbright Scholar in Nigeria in 1999 and a TED Fellow in 2007

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September 2013 Topic

August 13th, 2013 by Megan Kilb in Uncategorized · No Comments

Title: Serving the Information Poor: eGranary digital libraries in developing countries and incarcerated populations
Speaker: Cliff Missen, Clinical Associate Professor, UNC-SILS, and Director of the WiderNet Project
Where: Davis Library 214 A/B
When: Wednesday, September 11

Cliff Missen will provide an overview of the off-line eGranary Digital Library and the challenges that WiderNet faces when introducing new information technologies to people with little or no Internet experience.

Bio: Cliff Missen is Director of the nonprofit WiderNet Project and WiderNet@UNC, a service initiative of the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Launched in 2000, this project aims to improve digital communication in developing countries by identifying and promoting affordable technology. WiderNet trains computer technicians and coaches decision-makers across the developing world. It provides on-site hands-on training and conducts research on low cost information technology. Over 6,000 technicians, decision makers, and librarians have been through WiderNet training programs. WiderNet also produces the eGranary Digital Library, an innovative way to deliver the world’s knowledge to people and institutions with inadequate Internet access. Containing over 30 million Web resources, it is installed in more than 600 schools, hospitals, libraries, and universities in Africa, India, Bangladesh, and Haiti. Missen was a Senior Fulbright Scholar in Nigeria in 1999 and a TED Fellow in 2007

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May 2013 Topic

April 18th, 2013 by Megan Kilb in Uncategorized · No Comments

Speaker: Jason Priem, doctoral student, UNC SILS
Where: Davis Library, Rm 214
When: Wednesday, May 8th at NOON
Topic: Altmetrics and the Decoupled Journal

As the movement toward universal open access (OA) gathers momentum, the most salient OA questions are changing from “if” and even “when,” to “what will an OA world look like?” Is open access an incremental improvement, or will it lead to fundamental shifts in the way scholarship is communicated, filtered, and disseminated? In this talk, Jason will argue that the latter is the case: new ways of measuring scholarly impact on the social Web — “altmetrics” — will allow real-time, crowdsourced filtering of diverse scholarly products, leading to a new landscape of interoperable services that replace traditional journals. Jason will also demonstrate ImpactStory, an open-source tool for gathering altmetrics, and show how it can be used to promote OA, open data, and open source to faculty.

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April 2013 Topic

April 2nd, 2013 by Megan Kilb in Uncategorized · No Comments

Speaker: Ryan Shaw, Assistant Professor, SILS, UNC
Where: Davis Library, Rm 214
When: Wednesday, April 10th at NOON
Topic: Mining Oral Histories for Multiple Audiences

Millions of dollars have been spent on digitizing oral histories, preserving records of otherwise undocumented lives and experiences.

But a list of digital audio files and transcripts can seem impenetrable and intimidating to all but the most intrepid scholars.

If part of the mission of these projects is to make histories accessible to the public and produce fresh understandings of our past, digitization is not enough. How might computational tools be applied to organizing and presenting these histories in new ways, making them easier to comprehend and connect?

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March 2013 Topic

March 1st, 2013 by Megan Kilb in Uncategorized · No Comments

Speaker: Pam Lach, Manager of UNC’s Digital Innovation Lab
Where: Davis Library, Rm 214
When: Wednesday, March 13th at NOON
Topic: Digital Humanities at Carolina: Programs & Possibilities

Digital technologies are transforming the humanities in profound ways—from the very questions we can ask to the ways we communicate our interpretations to students, scholars, or a general audience. The Digital Innovation Lab has been working since October 2011 to make the digital humanities work accessible for scholars, students, and the public by lowering barriers of access—whether time, resources, or technical skill level. Adding to this work is the newly-launched Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative (CDHI), which was catalyzed by a $1.39 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The CDHI seeks to develop and test an adaptable and sustainable model of transformative academic practice that embraces faculty research, graduate and post-doctoral training, undergraduate learning, and engaged scholarship in the humanities. The CDHI hopes to intervene at all levels of academic practice at the University, from undergraduate and graduate training, to faculty development, and the hiring of new DH practitioners. This talk provides an overview of the CDHI and the Digital Innovation Lab (DIL).

Pam Lach is Manager of the Digital Innovation Lab (DIL) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She holds a PhD from UNC in U.S. Cultural History with an emphasis on gender and film history (2007), and a MS in Information Science from the UNC’s School of Information and Library Science. Pam is interested in how new and emerging technologies can support and redefine scholarship in the humanities and hopes to bridge the divide between technology and humanists. She oversees DIL staff and project work, including the development of DH Press, a WordPress-based digital humanities toolkit. During the 2012-2013 academic year she has assisted with the implementation of the Mellon-funded Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative.

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